The Healing Powers of Magic Soup

The Healing Powers of Magic Soup

I’ve never met a problem soup can’t fix. I’m lying! It may not fix everything but there’s no denying its magical way.

It is warm and wonderful, wild and courageous. (Courageous soup? Tell me more!) What other meal would so confidently offer that many vegetables and achieve such a seemingly effortless and delicious outcome? That, my friend, is what courage looks, tastes, and smells like.

Take it all in.

There are obvious factors that attract us to soup, the flavor first and foremost. Seemingly silly as we slurp and sip, soup is like baby food for the savvy soul. The taste draws you in every time, filling you down to your toes.

Although the taste is delicious, it’s not where the magic rests. The love and intention put into each batch serve in their own way. There is something bigger at play—soup is love.

Sick Lily

Years ago when the kids were younger, Lily got sick. (Younger than this photo, but I just had to include it!) She was sad and worried. Striving to help her feel better, I made her chicken soup. As I listed all of the healthy ingredients I’d included, I told her I added some extra love to help her feel better.

‘Like magic!’ She suggested.
‘Like magic.’ I confirmed.

It worked! From that point on it was known as Magic Soup.

Now that the kids are a little older, it’s not as easy to wash their worries away. My superpowers must be dulling—I can no longer fix things with my words or my ways like the good ol’ days. It’s time they find their own path. Still, they know I’ll always be there for them and whenever possible, I’ll work the little mom magic I have left.

When my kids are sick, I make soup.
When my kids are sad, I make soup.
If I need to lift someone’s spirits, I make soup.
I make soup when people are happy, and when they are sad.
It’s an “I’m sorry,” a “please,” and a “thank-you.”
There’s no denying its magical ways.

Soup is love.

IMG_1064

Ingredients:

I large onion, diced
4 large celery stalks, diced
4 large carrots, peeled and sliced
6 garlic cloves, chopped
1 large zucchini, quartered and sliced
1 large yellow squash, quartered and sliced
1 raw ear of corn, cut from the cob
3/4 tsp Himalayan Sea Salt
Cracked pepper as you like it
1 tsp celery flakes
2 32oz boxes chicken broth
1 cup water
1/2 lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs
2 lbs bone-in, skin on chicken breasts
1 package of egg noodles.

Cut vegetables

Instructions:

In your dutch oven on a medium-high heat, saute onions, celery, and garlic, salt, pepper flakes, and pepper in a drip of olive oil. (About 5 minutes.)
Add both boxes of the chicken broth.
Add raw chicken.
Bring to a boil, then lower to simmer and cover for about an hour.
Transfer just the chicken to a large bowl to cool.
Add zucchini, squash, and corn to the soup on low.
Remove meat from bones, dice or shred, and meat back to soup.
Once the zucchini is soft, turn off heat, remove the lid, let the soup sit.

In a separate pan, boil water for noodles. Cook as directed. Add noodles to cooled soup, or just prior to eating.

Delicious with bread & shredded parmesan cheese. Enjoy!

Pot of Soup

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6 thoughts on “The Healing Powers of Magic Soup

  1. Silly question- but when do the carrots go in? With onions and celery?

    1. Oh! Did I not write that?! Yes! With celery and onion! Enjoy!

  2. What is the size of the package of egg noodles? Is that what the 1 cup of water is used for in the recipe? Or does the water go into the soup?

    1. The water goes in the soup! The water to boil the pasta is separate— A 12 oz bag should be great. More if you LOVE lots of pasta. Enjoy and let me know how it goes! 🥣

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